Palm Trees - Diseases and Insects

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Palm Trees - Diseases and Insects

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    Effect of Harvesting Date and Variety of Date Palm on Antioxidant Capacity, Phenolic and Flavonoid Content of Date Palm (Phoenix Dactylifera)
    (Science and Education Publishing, 2014-08-20) Odeh, I. ; Al-Rimawi, F. ; Abbadi, J. ; Obeyat, L. ; Qabbajeh, M. ; Hroub, A.
    The effect of date palm variety and harvesting date on total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, and antioxidant capacity of seven varieties of date palm fruits collected at different maturation stages obtained from date palm farms located in the Jericho area of the Jordan valley was investigated in this study. During different harvesting times (from June to September 2011), total phenolic content, total flavonoid content, and antioxidant capacity varied between 13.75-231.40 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE), 1.72-9.6 mg catechin equivalents, and 142.0-719.3 μmol Trolox equivalents per 100 g dry weight sample for the seven varieties of date palm, respectively. Pearson correlation indicated that there is a strong significant correlation between antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content, as well as between antioxidant capacity and total flavonoid content for all date palm varieties investigated in this study. It is expected that these results will be useful to farmers particularly in their selection of harvesting time of the date palm fruits with high content of the bioactive compounds to meet the increasing demand on such healthy products.
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    Development and Validation of an HPLC-UV Method for Determination of Eight Phenolic Compounds in Date Palms
    (AOAC International, 2015-09-06) Al-Rimawi, Fuad ; Odeh, Imad
    A simple, precise, accurate, and selective method was developed and validated for determination of eight phenolic compounds (gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanilic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and sinapic acid) in date palms. Separation was achieved on an RP C18 column using the mobile phase methanol–water with 2% acetic acid (18 + 82, v/v). This method was validated according to the requirements for new methods, which include accuracy, precision, selectivity, robustness, LOD, LOQ, linearity, and range. The method demonstrated good linearity over the range 1–1000 ppm of gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanilic acid, caffeic acid, and syringic acid with r2 greater than 0.99, and in the range of 3–1000 ppm for p–coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and sinapic acid with r2 greater than 0.99. The recovery of the eight phenolic compounds ranged from 97.1 to 102.2%. The method is selective because adjacent peaks of phenolic compounds were well separated with good resolution. The degree of reproducibility of the results obtained as a result of small deliberate variations in the method parameters and by changing analytical operators proved that the method is robust and rugged.
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    Development and Validation of an HPLC-UV Method for Determination of Eight Phenolic Compounds in Date Palms
    (AOAC International, 2015-05-03) Al-Rimawi, Fuad ; Odeh, Imad
    A simple, precise, accurate, and selective method was developed and validated for determination of eight phenolic compounds (gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanilic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and sinapic acid) in date palms. Separation was achieved on an RP C18 column using the mobile phase methanol–water with 2% acetic acid (18 + 82, v/v). This method was validated according to the requirements for new methods, which include accuracy, precision, selectivity, robustness, LOD, LOQ, linearity, and range. The method demonstrated good linearity over the range 1–1000 ppm of gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanilic acid, caffeic acid, and syringic acid with r2 greater than 0.99, and in the range of 3–1000 ppm for p–coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and sinapic acid with r2 greater than 0.99. The recovery of the eight phenolic compounds ranged from 97.1 to 102.2%. The method is selective because adjacent peaks of phenolic compounds were well separated with good resolution. The degree of reproducibility of the results obtained as a result of small deliberate variations in the method parameters and by changing analytical operators proved that the method is robust and rugged.