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Experiences of Habitual Physical Activity in Maintaining Roles and Functioning among Older Adults: A Qualitative Study
(Rehabilitation Research and Practice, 2016-11-24) Hadeel Halaweh; Ulla Svantesson; Carin Willén
Physically active older adults have reduced risk of functional restrictions and role limitations. Several aspects may interrelate and influence habitual physical activity (PA). However, older adults’ own perspectives towards their PA need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of habitual physical activity in maintaining roles and functioning among older adult Palestinians ≥60 years. Data were collected through in-depth interviews based on a narrative approach. Seventeen participants were recruited (aged 64–84 years). Data were analyzed using a narrative interpretative method. Findings. Three central narratives were identified,“keep moving, stay healthy,” “social connectedness, a motive to stay active,” and “adapting strategies to age-related changes.” Conclusion. Habitual physical activity was perceived as an important factor to maintain functioning and to preserve active roles in older adults. Walking was the most prominent pattern of physical activity and it was viewed as a vital tool to maintain functioning among the older adults. Social connectedness was considered as a contributing factor to the status of staying active. To adapt the process of age-related changes in a context to stay active, the participants have used different adapting strategies, including protective strategy, awareness of own capabilities, and modifying or adopting new roles.
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Perspectives of Older Adults on Aging Well: A Focus Group Stud
(Journal of Aging Research, 2018-11-04) Hadeel Halaweh; Synneve Dahlin-Ivanoff; Ulla Svantesson; Carin Willen
Background. With an increasing number of older adults worldwide, promoting health and well-being becomes a priority for aging well. Well-being and physical and mental health are closely related, and this relation may become more vital at older ages as it may contribute to aging well. (the state of well-being is a multifaceted phenomenon that refers to an individual’s subjective feelings, and exploring perspectives of older adults on aging well is developing to be an important area of research. (therefore, the aim of this study was to explore perceptions of aging well among older adult Palestinians ≥60 years. Methods. A qualitative research design in the context of focus group discussions was used; seven focus groups were conducted including fifty-six participants (aged 63–81 years). Data were analyzed using a qualitative interpretative thematic approach described by Braun and Clarke. Results. (ree major themes were identified, “sense of well-being,” “having good physical health,” and “preserving good mental health.” (e participants perceived that aging well is influenced by positive feelings such as being joyous, staying independent, having a life purpose, self-possessed contentment, and financially secured, in addition, to be socially engaged and enjoying good physical and mental health. Conclusion. (is study contributes to getting a better insight concerning older adults’ perspectives on aging well. Enhancing a physically active lifestyle, participation in social and leisure activities, healthy eating habits, having a purpose in life, and being intellectually engaged are all contributing factors to aging well. Vital factors are to be considered in developing strategic health and rehabilitative plans for promoting aging well among older adults.
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Association between physical activity and physical functioning in community-dwelling older adults
(2016-10-31) Hadeel Halaweh; Carin Willén; Ulla Svantesson
Aim: To evaluate the association between the level of physical activity (PA) and physical functioning among community-dwelling older adults. Methods: A total of 176 older adults were assessed with a PA socio-cultural adapted questionnaire (PA-SCAQ), the participants were categorized into three PA groups (low, moderate, and high). Physical functioning was examined by using: Hand Grip Strength (HGS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Statistical analyses were performed to determine differences between the groups according to age, gender, and PA level. Spearman’s correlation was used to examine the association between the PA level and physical functioning values. Major findings: Older adults who participated in moderate-intensity aerobic PA for 150 min/week have recorded higher values of physical functioning than older adults who were classified as low physically active (p < 0.001). PA levels were positively correlated with HGS and SPPB and negatively correlated with TUG (p < 0.001). Conclusion: There were strong associations between higher levels of PA and levels of physical functioning (p < 0.001). Moderate to high levels of PA may contribute to maintaining physical functioning among community-dwelling older adults.
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Correlation between Health-Related Quality of Life and Hand Grip Strength among Older Adults
(Experimental Aging Research, 2020-01-12) Hadeel Halaweh
Background: With advanced age, the progressive loss of muscle strength estimated by the handgrip strength (HGS) may result in a poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Studying this associa tion becomes a vital area of research for promoting aging-well. The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between HRQoL and HGS among community-dwelling older adults above 60 years old. Methods: Participants comprised of 176 older adults (mean age: 68.15 ± 6.74). The HGS was tested with Jamar® Dynamometer, and the EuroQuol-5 Dimensions 5Levels (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaire was used to assess HRQoL. Results: Both HGS and HRQoL were negatively correlated with age (p < .001). Lower values of HGS and HRQoL were recorded among older adults who had diagnosed with one or more chronic diseases (p < .001). Significant correlations were recorded between HGS and functioning, and subjective well-being domains of EQ-5D-5L. A relatively higher association was recorded between the functioning variables of EQ-5D-5L and HGS compared to subjective well- being variables. Conclusion: Handgrip strength is a simple and practical measure in identifying older adults at risk of physical decline. Maintaining hand grip strength may contribute to improving HRQoL, and can add an imperative dimension to promote aging-well in older adults ≥60 years old
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Implications of Active Aging on Aging Well: Mixed-Methods Quantitative–Qualitative Study
(International Summit on Aging & Gerontology, 2019-05-27) Hadeel Halaweh
Introduction: Worldwide, the ratio of people aged 60 and over is growing faster than any other age group. By 2025, there will be 1.2 billion people over 60. With an increasing number of older adults; aging well becomes a priority, and measures to help older people remain healthy and active are developing to be an important area of research. The concept of active aging intends to extend healthy life expectancy and quality of life for all people as they age, including those who are frail and in need of care. This study aims to explore the implications of active aging on aging well among older adults≥60 years. Methods: Quantitative data were collected (176 participants, mean age: 68.15 ± 6.74), using a demographic clinical questionnaire, a physical activity socio-cultural adapted questionnaire, EuroQuol-5 Dimensions and Physical functioning tests (Hand Grip Strength, Timed Up and Go, and Short Physical Performance Battery). Statistical analyses were performed to determine differences between the groups according to gender, the prevalence of comorbid conditions, and physical activity level. For the qualitative data, a qualitative research design in the context of focus group discussions and in-depth personal interviews was used; seven focus groups included 56 participants and 17 participants were personally interviewed (aged 63–84 years). Data were analyzed using a qualitative thematic approach described by Braun and Clarke and a narrative interpretative method. Results: Physically active older adults recorded a lower prevalence of chronic diseases including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases (P < 0.001). Older adults who participated in moderate-intensity aerobic PA for 150 min/week recorded higher values of physical functioning and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) than older adults who were classified as low physically active (p < 0.001). Staying active was perceived as an important factor in maintaining functioning and preserving active roles with aging. Five themes were identified, “keep moving, stay healthy,” “social connectedness, a motive to stay active,” “staying independent”, “having a life purpose” and “enjoying good physical and mental health”. Conclusion: Moderate to high levels of physical activity may contribute to maintaining physical functioning and better HRQoL among community-dwelling older adults above 60 years old. Active aging contributes to aging well; that was manifested in this study through enhancing the health-related quality of life, good physical and mental health, physically active lifestyle, social participation, and independent.