Advanced Waste Water Treatment

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Overview

Waste Water Treatment

Our Team

  • Rafik Karaman

    Prof.

  • Jehad Abbadi

    Ph.D.

    Mohannad Qurei

    Ph.D.

    Mustafa Khamis

    Ph.D

    Browse

    Recent Submissions

    Now showing 1 - 5 of 6
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      The Response of Chickpea to Irrigation with Treated Waste Water
      (David Publishing, 2013-09-20) Haddad, Marwan ; Khamis, Mustafa ; Dakiky, Majdi ; Manassra, Adnan ; Qurie, Mohannad ; Karaman, Rafik
      In a three-year study, the response of four cultivars of chickpea, Bulgarit, WIR-32, Jordan and ICC 11293 to irrigation with TW (treated wastewater) and FW (freshwater), using surface and subsurface drip irrigation was investigated. Wastewater generated from Al-Quds university campus included black, grey and storm water was treated by small scale pilot plant. The wastewater pilot plant consists of tailored made secondary biological activated sludge process with daily capacity of 50 m3. The influent and effluent chemical and biological quality parameters were routinely monitored and analyzed. The data reveal that the average values for BOD, COD and EC for the effluent are 50 ppm, 136 ppm and 1.4 mS/cm over 2 years period. The results of chickpea growth parameters and the chemical and biological analysis of the seeds and leaves indicate that the cultivars Bulgarit and ICC 11293 can be irrigated with TW without any loss in yield and quality. Factor analysis reasonably favored Bulgarit Cultivar irrigated with treated effluent over other cultivars. WIR-32 and Jordan cultivars showed significant reduction in their growth parameters when irrigated with TW as compared with FW. Surface and subsurface drip irrigation gave similar results in most cases. Soil analysis in this study showed no significant difference between irrigation with TW and FW.
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      Toward Zero Liquid Discharge from Integrated Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant
      ( 2015-07-03) Qurie, Mohannad ; Khamis, Mustafa ; Karaman, Rafik
      Water is considered among the most important, vital and crucial resources on earth. It is one of the basic ingredients utilized by living organisms and it is essential for achieving economic and social development in all countries over the world. The Mediterranean Countries, such as Palestine suffer from scarcity of fresh water and a significant water shortage while the demand of clean water is increasing. The water shortage can be attributed to different factors including agriculture consumption, industrialization, over pump of fresh water from aquifers, urbanization and socioeconomic development. The use of recycled water could help solving part of the region’s water problems. Moreover, many lands in the Mediterranean Countries, including Palestine, are affected by incoming desertification processes, which hinder the development and conservation of a normal agricultural and touristic economy. The specific problems to be addressed in the near future are the fresh water shortage and quality and the use of the recycled water to fill part of the gap. In this paper we discuss different approaches for wastewater recycling and water purification. The treatment of wastewater is capable of generating new water resources as an alternative for water shortage, for reuse in agriculture, and for protection of the ground water from pollution and health hazardous.
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      Removal of diclofenac potassium from wastewater using clay-micelle complex
      (Taylor & Francis, 2013-08-02) Karaman, Rafik ; Khamis, Mustafa ; Quried, Mohannad ; Halabieh, Rawan ; Makharzeh, Iman ; Manassra, Adnan ; Abbadi, Jehad ; Qtait, Alaa ; Nasser, Ahmed
      The presence of an ionized carboxyl group in the widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drug diclofenac potassium results in a high mobility of diclofenac and in its low sorption under conditions of slow sand filtration or subsoil passage. No diclofenac degradation was detected in pure water or sludge during one month. Tertiary treatments of wastewater indicated that the effective removal of diclofenac was by reverse osmosis, but the removal by activated carbon was less satisfactory. This study presents an efficient method for the removal of diclofenac from water by micelle–clay composites that are positively charged, have a large surface area and include large hydrophobic domains. Adsorption of diclofenac in dispersion by charcoal and a composite micelle (otadecyltrimethylammonium [ODTMA] and clay [montmorillonite]) was investigated. Analysis by the Langmuir isotherm revealed that charcoal had a somewhat larger number of adsorption sites than the composite, but the latter had a significantly larger binding affinity for diclofenac. Filtration experiments on a solution containing 300 ppm diclofenac demonstrated poor removal by activated carbon, in contrast to very efficient removal by micelle–clay filters. In the latter case the weight of removed diclofenac exceeded half that of ODTMA in the filter. Filtration of diclofenac solutions at concentrations of 8 and 80 ppb yielded almost complete removal at flow rates of 30 and 60mLmin−1. One kilogram of ODTMA in the micelle–clay filter has been estimated to remove more than 99% of diclofenac from a solution of 100 ppb during passage of more than 100m3.
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      Removal of chlorpyrifos using micelle–clay complex and advanced treatment technology
      (Balaban Desalination Publications, 2015-10-06) Qurie, Mohannad ; Khamis, Mustafa ; Ayyad, Ibrahim ; Karaman, Rafik
      In this study, the stability of chlorpyrifos, a known pesticide, in fresh water and sludge was investigated. The results showed that chlorpyrifos underwent hydrolysis in both media to give two main metabolites: 3,5,6-trichoro-2-pyridiniol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphoric acid (DETP). The hydrolysis reaction in both media was found to follow first-order kinetics with a rate constant of 7.10 × 10−8 (R2 = 0.999) in pure water and of 9.30 × 10−8 (R2 = 0.996) in sludge. Chlorpyrifos degradation’s half-life value in pure water was 112 d and in sludge was 85.9 d. The efficiency of Al-Quds University wastewater treatment plant demonstrated that the ultrafiltration-hollow fiber unit (UF-HF) was insufficient in removing chlorpyrifos from spiked secondary treated wastewater samples, whereas the combination of ultrafiltration-spiral wound unit (UF-SW) followed by activated carbon (AC) column was quite efficient and yielded a complete removal of the pesticide. Batch adsorption experiments using either AC or micelle–clay complex were performed and the experimental results were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption analysis using Langmuir isotherm revealed that Qmax for the AC was higher than that of the micelle–clay complex, while Freundlich isotherm showed almost similar values of n (3.413 vs. 3.745) for both adsorbents, despite the fact that the activated carbon filter showed higher kF value. Filtration column of mixed micelle–clay complex and sand demonstrated a breakthrough point after the third fraction for chlorpyrifos removal and a complete removal for all fractions collected in the TCP experiment. This result reveals that mixed micelle–clay complex and sand column is much more efficient in removing TCP than removing its parent compound, chlorpyrifos.
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      Removal of Diclofenac Potassium from Wastewater Using Clay-Micelle Complex
      (Taylor & Francis, 2012-01-13) Karaman, Rafik ; Khamis, Mustafa ; Quried, Mohannad ; Halabieh, Rawan ; Makharzeh, Iman ; Manassra, Adnan ; Abbadi, Jehad ; Qtait, Alaa ; Nasser, Ahmed
      The presence of an ionized carboxyl group in the widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) drug diclofenac potassium results in a high mobility of diclofenac and in its low sorption under conditions of slow sand filtration or subsoil passage. No diclofenac degradation was detected in pure water or sludge during one month. Tertiary treatments of wastewater indicated that the effective removal of diclofenac was by reverse osmosis, but the removal by activated carbon was less satisfactory. This study presents an efficient method for the removal of diclofenac from water by micelle–clay composites that are positively charged, have a large surface area and include large hydrophobic domains. Adsorption of diclofenac in dispersion by charcoal and a composite micelle (otadecyltrimethylammonium [ODTMA] and clay [montmorillonite]) was investigated. Analysis by the Langmuir isotherm revealed that charcoal had a somewhat larger number of adsorption sites than the composite, but the latter had a significantly larger binding affinity for diclofenac. Filtration experiments on a solution containing 300 ppm diclofenac demonstrated poor removal by activated carbon, in contrast to very efficient removal by micelle–clay filters. In the latter case the weight of removed diclofenac exceeded half that of ODTMA in the filter. Filtration of diclofenac solutions at concentrations of 8 and 80 ppb yielded almost complete removal at flow rates of 30 and 60mLmin−1. One kilogram of ODTMA in the micelle–clay filter has been estimated to remove more than 99% of diclofenac from a solution of 100 ppb during passage of more than 100m3.