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dc.contributor.authorHerzallah, Mohammad M.
dc.contributor.authorMoustafa, Ahmed A.
dc.contributor.authorNatsheh, Joman Y.
dc.contributor.authorDanoun, Omar A.
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Jessica R.
dc.contributor.authorTayem, Yasin I.
dc.contributor.authorSehwail, Mahmud A.
dc.contributor.authorAmleh, Ivona
dc.contributor.authorBannoura, Issam
dc.contributor.authorPetrides, Georgios
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Catherine E.
dc.contributor.authorGluck, Mark A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-29T08:53:00Z
dc.date.available2018-09-29T08:53:00Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-01
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.alquds.edu/handle/20.500.12213/1016
dc.description.abstractTo better understand how medication status and task demands affect cognition in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), we evaluated medication-naïve patients with MDD, medicated patients with MDD receiving the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) paroxetine, and healthy controls. All three groups were administered a computer-based cognitive task with two phases, an initial phase in which a sequence is learned through reward-based feedback (which our prior studies suggest is striatal-dependent), followed by a generalization phase that involves a change in the context where learned rules are to be applied (which our prior studies suggest is hippocampal-region dependent). Medication-naïve MDD patients were slow to learn the initial sequence but were normal on subsequent generalization of that learning. In contrast, medicated patients learned the initial sequence normally, but were impaired at the generalization phase. We argue that these data suggest (i) an MDD-related impairment in striatal-dependent sequence learning which can be remediated by SSRIs and (ii) an SSRI-induced impairment in hippocampaldependent generalization of past learning to novel contexts, not otherwise seen in the medicationnaïve MDD group. Thus, SSRIs might have a beneficial effect on striatal function required for sequence learning, but a detrimental effect on the hippocampus and other medial temporal lobe structures critical for generalization.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank Al-Quds Cognitive Neuroscience Lab students: Salam Abdellatif, Dana Deeb, Aya Imam, Issa Isaac, Hussain Khdour, Jeries Kort and Mohammad Taha for their excellent technical assistance. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health Award R21MH095656 from the Fogarty International Center and the National Institute of Mental Health to MAG, the Palestinian American Research Center (PARC), as well as generous donations from Saad N. Mouasher, Daryl Kulok, Dr. Samih Darwazah and Stewart and Lois Gross.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectMajor Depressive Disorderen_US
dc.subjectSelective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI)en_US
dc.subjecthippocampusen_US
dc.subjectbasal gangliaen_US
dc.subjectrewarden_US
dc.subjectpunishmenten_US
dc.subjectsequence learningen_US
dc.subjectcontext-shiften_US
dc.subjectgeneralizationen_US
dc.titleDepression Impairs Learning, whereas the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor, Paroxetine, Impairs Generalization in Patients with Major Depressive Disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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